J.P. Morgan Sued for Edward Turley and Steven Foote’s Alleged Margin Account Misconduct

J.P. Morgan Securities, LLC (“J.P. Morgan”) employed San Francisco Financial Advisor Edward Turley (“Mr. Turley”) and his former New York City partner, Steven Foote (“Mr. Foote”), and is being sued for their alleged stockbroker fraud and stockbroker misconduct involving a highly speculative trading investment strategy in highly leveraged margin accounts1. We represent a family (the “Claimants”) in the Southwest who built a successful manufacturing business and entrusted their savings to J.P. Morgan and its two financial advisors to manage by investing in “solid companies” and in a “careful” manner. At the outset, it is important for our readers to know that our clients’ allegations have not yet been proven. We are providing information about our clients’ allegations and seeking information from other investors who did business with J.P. Morgan, Mr. Turley, and/or Mr. Foote and had similar investments, a similar investment strategy, and a similar bad experience to help us win our clients’ case. INTRODUCTION This case is about alleged misrepresentations and misleading statements relating to investments and an investment strategy that were not only allegedly unsuitable for the Claimants but allegedly mismanaged by J.P. Morgan investment advisors and stockbrokers, Mr. Foote and Mr. Turley. Mr. Foote represented, in writing, the investment strategy only involved “solid companies with good income producing securities.” Later, Mr. Foote represented, in writing, that Mr. Turley and he would only “carefully add leverage to the accounts to enhance returns.” Notwithstanding the representations, Mr. Foote and Mr. Turley took control of Claimants’ accounts and engaged in a speculative, over-leveraged fixed income investment strategy involving excessive trading of high yield “junk” bonds, foreign bonds, preferred stocks, exchange traded funds (“ETFs”), master limited partnerships (“MLPs”), and foreign currencies. In March 2019, Mr. Foote became too ill to manage Claimants’ accounts, and Mr. Turley took sole control of the portfolio. Thereafter, Mr. Turley recklessly increased the risks (market, over-concentration, interest rate, leverage, commodities, and foreign currency) to which Claimants and their accounts were allegedly exposed. The family’s portfolio became even more over-concentrated in the financial and energy sectors under Mr. Turley’s control. He made a multi-million dollar investment in unregistered Nine Energy Senior Notes rated by S&P B- (speculative) in Claimants’ accounts. Mr. Turley also allegedly turned over the fixed income assets with new investments in “new issue” preferred stocks underwritten by J.P. Morgan, for which he allegedly received “seller concessions” paid at a much higher percentage than regular commissions on other securities transactions. Over the next six months, the margin balances increased by millions of dollars, and the Claimants’ accounts became ticking time bombs ready to explode at any moment. Indeed, they did explode in March 2020 when the market collapsed and Claimants realized substantial losses in their accounts. THE RELEVANT FACTS Our clients live on a ranch in a remote area in northern Texas. They regularly commute by private airplane to work and elsewhere for business and pleasure. One of our clients is a member of the Citation Jet Pilot Owners Association (“CJP”), an organization of many wealthy business people who own Citation jets. This organization holds its meetings throughout the country. It so happened that Mr. Foote and Mr. Turley were also members of the CJP. In the summer of 2016, Mr. Foote successfully solicited our clients at their ranch in Texas to manage their investment portfolio. At that ranch meeting, Mr. Foote described an investment strategy that he and his partner, Mr. Turley, managed for all of their biggest and best clients. According to Mr. Foote, they conservatively managed a fixed-income strategy that included investments in corporate bonds, notes, and preferred stocks. At that meeting and repeatedly thereafter, Mr. Foote told our clients that Mr. Turley and he only invested in “solid companies with good income producing securities.” Mr. Foote boasted that Mr. Turley and he were first in line for the best investment opportunities at J.P. Morgan because of their status at the firm. Our clients were impressed by Mr. Foote and especially by what he told him about Mr. Turley. They appeared to share our clients’ passion for aviation and the CJP and, more importantly, their religious beliefs. They agreed to transfer one-half of the investment portfolio to J.P. Morgan under Mr. Foote and Mr. Turley’s stewardship. The other half was managed by a UBS Financial Services, Inc. (“UBS”) financial advisor. In the beginning, Mr. Foote was the primary manager of the relationship with Claimants. All of the investments in the Claimants’ accounts were either allegedly “solicited” by Mr. Foote or executed by Mr. Foote and Mr. Turley’s use of “de facto” discretion because, on information and belief, none of the Claimants ever executed any documents giving either Mr. Foote, Mr. Turley, or any other person at J.P Morgan written discretionary authority over the Claimants’ accounts. The Claimants did not think this was unusual because they had a special relationship with Mr. Foote, whom they placed their trust and confidence in to manage their accounts as their investment adviser and portfolio manager. By the spring of 2017, Mr. Foote and Mr. Turley had fully invested Claimants’ accounts, so they injected leverage into their speculative investment strategy to make more commissions. Mr. Foote allegedly told our clients they also “carefully” managed a fixed-income strategy that would profit primarily from the difference in the high interest paid on corporate bonds, notes, and preferred stocks and the low margin interest rates. Mr. Foote allegedly assured Claimants that the strategy was safe and was used all of the time by banks and institutional and other wealthy clients to make money when interest rates were low to take advantage of the spread in interest rates. In fact, at that time, Mr. Foote misrepresented, in writing, that “we will keep pursuing solid companies with good income producing securities and we will continue to carefully add leverage to the accounts to enhance returns.” To the contrary, Mr. Foote and Mr. Turley quickly and recklessly ratcheted up the margin balances to over $7.1 million by the end of August 2017. It...

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FINRA Arbitration: What To Expect And Why You Should Choose Our Law Firm

If you are reading this article, you are probably an investor who has lost a substantial amount of money, Googled “Securities Arbitration Attorney,” clicked on a number of attorney websites, and maybe even spoken with a so-called “Securities Arbitration Lawyer” who told you after a five minute telephone call that “you have a great case;” “you need to sign a retainer agreement on a ‘contingency fee’ basis;” and “you need to act now because the statute of limitations is going to run.” You may want to ask yourself whether that attorney is as bad as the stockbrokers you were concerned about in the first place. Some attorneys will rush you to hire them before you speak to anyone else and not tell you about the clause in their contract that allows them to drop you as a client later on if they cannot get a quick settlement. They will solicit you without a real case evaluation and/or without any explanation of Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”) proceedings. The scenario above is not the way for attorneys to properly serve clients, and it is not the way we do business at The Law Offices of Robert Wayne Pearce, P.A. If you are planning on speaking or meeting with us or any other attorney, let us introduce you to the FINRA arbitration proceeding by giving you some information in advance to help you understand the different stages of FINRA arbitration, what you should expect from skilled and experienced FINRA securities arbitration lawyers, and what you should expect to personally do in order to have the best outcome: 1. CASE REVIEW Before we accept any case, our attorneys conduct a thorough interview of you to understand: the nature of your relationship with your broker; the level of your financial sophistication; the representations or promises made to you in connection with any investment recommendation; and your personal investment experience, investment objectives, and financial condition at the time of any recommendation or relevant time period. We will review your account records, including, but not limited to: account statements; confirmations; new account opening documents; contracts; correspondence; emails; presentations; and marketing materials that you may have received in connection with your accounts and the investments made therein, etc. Investors rarely contact our office without knowing whether they have suffered investment losses, but sometimes that occurs because the particular investor does not have all their records and/or is unsophisticated, inexperienced, and unable to decipher the account records they retained. If you retained your account statements and provide them, we should be able to at least estimate (under the different measures of damages) the amount you may be able to recover if you win your arbitration proceeding. If you do not have those records, we will help you retrieve them without any obligation so that all of us are fully aware of the amount we may possibly recover for you if we are successful in arbitration. In addition, we will spend the time necessary to get to know you and the facts of your dispute to have a good chance of success in proving your case. After all, it does not benefit either you or our law firm to file an arbitration claim that, months or years later, we discover has little chance of success. Ultimately, we want to know, and so should you, whether or not you have a claim with merit and are likely to recover damages if we go through a full arbitration proceeding. The fact is Attorney Pearce does not take cases unless he and his team believe you suffered an injustice and are likely to succeed at the final arbitration hearing. 2. THE STATEMENT OF CLAIM Many of these young and/or inexperienced attorneys with flashy websites and Google Ad Word advertisements (to get them to the top of the page) are more interested in marketing and signing up cases to settle early than they are in going all the way and winning your case at a final arbitration hearing for a just result. Oftentimes, they will insert your name in a form pleading, one that they use in every case, which states little more than if you (the “Claimant”) were an investor with brokerage firm ABC and stockbroker XYZ (the “Respondent(s)”) made misrepresentations, failed to disclose facts, made unsuitable recommendations, and violated laws 123, you are entitled to damages. They are unwilling and/or fail to take the time necessary to study the strengths and weaknesses of your case and write a detailed Statement of Claim (also referred to as the “Complaint”) with all of the relevant facts necessary to inform the arbitrators what happened and why you are entitled to recover your damages. That is not the way Attorney Pearce, with over 40 years of experience with investment disputes, files a Statement of Claim, the first and sometimes the only document that the arbitrators will read before the final arbitration hearing. 3. THE ANSWER After we file the Statement of Claim and it is served, the brokerage firm and/or stockbroker will have forty-five (45) days to file the Answer to your allegations. Oftentimes, the Respondent(s) will ask for an extension of time to file the Answer and we will give it to them provided no other deadline is extended, particularly the deadlines associated with the selection of arbitrators and scheduling of the initial pre-hearing conference, where all of the other important deadlines and dates of the final arbitration hearing are scheduled. Some clients have asked why would you give them extra time to file their best Answer? Well, we believe after 40 years of doing these FINRA arbitrations, that it is better to know the story they intend to tell the arbitrators early on and lock them in so we can come up with the best strategy and all the case law necessary to overcome their best defenses and win your arbitration. In other words, we would rather know about the defense early on than be surprised at the final hearing. Besides, Respondent(s) can always try to file...

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