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J.P. Morgan Sued For Edward Turley’s Alleged Misconduct: $55 Million!

The Law Offices of Robert Wayne Pearce, P.A. has filed another case against Ex-J.P. Morgan broker Ed Turley for alleged misrepresentations, misleading statements, unsuitable recommendations, and mismanagement of Claimants’ accounts. The Law Offices of Robert Wayne Pearce has filed another case against J.P. Morgan Securities for alleged misrepresentations, misleading statements, unsuitable recommendations, and mismanagement of Claimants’ accounts continuing in fall 2019 and thereafter by Edward Turley (“Turley”), a former “Vice-Chairman” of J.P. Morgan. At the outset, it is important for our readers to know that our clients’ allegations have not yet been proven. IMPORTANT: We are providing information about our clients’ allegations and seeking information from other investors who did business with J.P. Morgan and Mr. Turley and had similar investments, a similar investment strategy, and a similar bad experience to help us win our clients’ case. Please contact us online via our contact form or by giving us a ring at (800) 732-2889. Latest Updates on Ed Turley – November 18, 2022 The Advisor Hub reported today that the former star broker with J.P. Morgan Advisors in San Francisco Edward Turley agreed to an industry bar rather than cooperate with FINRA’s probe of numerous allegations of excessive and unauthorized trading that resulted in more than $100 million worth of customer complaints. FINRA had initiated its investigation of Edward Turley as it related to numerous customer complaints in 2020. The regulator noted in its Acceptance Waiver and Consent Agreement (AWC) that the investors had generally alleged “sales practice violations including improper exercise of discretion and unsuitable trading.” According to Edward Turley’s BrokerCheck report, he had been fired in August 2021 for “loss of confidence concerning adherence to firm policies and brokerage order handling requirements.” On October 28th, FINRA requested Turley provide on-the-record testimony related to his trading patterns, including the “use of foreign currency and margin, and the purchasing and selling of high-yield bonds and preferred stock,” but Edward Turley through counsel declined to do so. As a result, Edward Turley violated FINRA’s Rule 8210 requiring cooperation with enforcement probes, and its catch-all Rule 2010 requiring “high standards of commercial honor,” the regulator said and he was barred permanently from the securities industry. Related Read: Can You Sue a Financial Advisor or Stockbroker Over Losses? Turley Allegedly Misrepresented And Misled Claimants About His Investment Strategy The claims arise out of Turley’s “one-size-fits-all” fixed income credit spread investment strategy involving high-yield “junk” bonds, preferred stocks, exchange traded funds (“ETFs”), master limited partnerships (“MLPs”), and foreign bonds. Instead of purchasing those securities in ordinary margin accounts, Turley executed foreign currency transactions to raise capital and leverage clients’ accounts to earn undisclosed commissions. Turley over-leveraged and over-concentrated his best and biggest clients’ accounts, including Claimants’ accounts, in junk bonds, preferred stocks, and MLPs in the financial and energy sectors, which are notoriously illiquid and subject to sharp price declines when the financial markets become stressed as they did in March 2020. In the beginning and throughout the investment advisory relationship, Turley described his investment strategy to Claimants as one which would generate “equity returns with very low bond-type risk.” Turley and his partners also described the strategy to clients and prospects as one “which provided equity-like returns without equity-like risk.” J.P. Morgan supervisors even documented Turley’s description of the strategy as “creating portfolio with similar returns, but less volatility than an all-equity portfolio.” Note: It appears that no J.P. Morgan supervisor ever checked to see if the representations were true and if anybody did, they would have known Turley was lying and have directly participated in the scheme. The Claimants’ representative was also told Turley used leverage derived from selling foreign currencies, Yen and Euros, to get the “equity-like” returns he promised. Turley also told the investor not to be concerned because he “carefully” added leverage to enhance returns. According to Turley, the securities of the companies he invested in for clients “did not move up or down like the stock market,” so there was no need to worry about him using leverage in Claimants’ accounts and their cash would be available whenever it was needed. The Claimants’ representative was not the only client who heard this from Turley; that is, he did not own volatile stocks and not to worry about leverage. Turley did not discuss the amount of leverage he used in clients’ accounts, which ranged from 1:1 to 3:1, nor did Turley discuss the risks currency transactions added to the portfolio, margin calls or forced liquidations as a result of his investment strategy. After all, Turley knew he could get away without disclosing those risks. This was because J.P. Morgan suppressed any margin calls being sent to Turley’s clients and he liquidated securities on his own to meet those margin calls without alarming clients.  This “one-size-fits-all” strategy was a recipe for disaster. J.P. Morgan and Turley have both admitted that Turley’s investment strategy was not suitable for any investor whose liquid net worth was fully invested in the strategy. It was especially unsuitable for those customers like Claimants who had other plans for the funds in their J.P. Morgan accounts in fall 2019 and spring 2020. Unfortunately, Turley recommended and managed the “one-size-fits-all” strategy for his best clients and friends, including Claimants. Turley was Claimants’ investment advisor and portfolio manager and required under the law to serve them as a “fiduciary.” He breached his “fiduciary” duties in making misrepresentations, misleading statements, unsuitable recommendations, and mismanagement of Claimants’ accounts. The most egregious breach was his failure to take any action to protect his clients at the end of February 2020, when J.P. Morgan raised the red flags about COVID-19 and recommended defensive action be taken in clients’ accounts. Turley Allegedly Managed Claimants’ Accounts Without Written Discretionary Authority Claimants’ representative hired Turley to manage his “dry powder,” the cash in Claimants’ accounts at J.P. Morgan, which he would need on short notice when business opportunities arose. At one point, Claimants had over $100 million on deposit with J.P. Morgan. It was not...

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Investors With “Blown-Out” Securities-Backed Credit Line and Margin Accounts: How do You Recover Your Investment Losses?

If you are reading this article, we are guessing you had a bad experience recently in either a securities-backed line of credit (“SBL”) or margin account that suffered margin calls and was liquidated without notice, causing you to realize losses. Ordinarily, investors with margin calls receive 3 to 5 days to meet them; and if that happened, the value of the securities in your account might have increased within that period and the firm might have erased the margin call and might not have liquidated your account. If you are an investor who has experienced margin calls in the past, and that is your only complaint then, read no further because when you signed the account agreement with the brokerage firm you chose to do business with, you probably gave it the right to liquidate all of the securities in your account at any time without notice. On the other hand, if you are an investor with little experience or one with a modest financial condition who was talked into opening a securities-backed line of credit account without being advised of the true nature, mechanics, and/or risks of opening such an account, then you should call us now! Alternatively, if you are an investor who needed to withdraw money for a house or to pay for your taxes or child’s education but was talked into holding a risky or concentrated portfolio of stocks and/or junk bonds in a pledged collateral account for a credit-line or a margin account, then we can probably help you recover your investment losses as well. The key to a successful recovery of your investment loss is not to focus on the brokerage firm’s liquidation of the securities in your account without notice. Instead, the focus on your case should be on what you were told and whether the recommendation was suitable for you before you opened the account and suffered the liquidation.

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FINRA Arbitration: What To Expect And Why You Should Choose Our Law Firm

If you are reading this article, you are probably an investor who has lost a substantial amount of money, Googled “FINRA Arbitration Lawyer,” clicked on a number of attorney websites, and maybe even spoken with a so-called “Securities Arbitration Lawyer” who told you after a five minute telephone call that “you have a great case;” “you need to sign a retainer agreement on a ‘contingency fee’ basis;” and “you need to act now because the statute of limitations is going to run.”

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A Stockbroker’s Introduction to FINRA Examinations and Investigations

Brokers and financial advisors oftentimes do not understand what their responsibilities and obligations are and what may result from a Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) examination or investigation. Many brokers do not even know the role that FINRA plays within the industry. This may be due to the fact that FINRA, a self-regulatory organization, is not a government entity and cannot sentence financial professionals to jail time for violation of industry rules and regulations. Nevertheless, all broker-dealers doing business with members of the public must register with FINRA. As registered members, broker-dealers, and the brokers working for them, have agreed to abide by industry rules and regulations, which include FINRA rules.

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How SEC Investigations Work: Process, Timeline, and Causes

You never want to be in the situation where the SEC is investigating you, but when they do, you must act quickly and decisively to minimize any harm. In this article, we’ll take a look at some of the most common reasons why the SEC might initiate an investigation into a company or individual, the SEC investigation process, how long SEC investigations take, and some steps you can take to protect yourself if it happens to you. What Causes an SEC Investigation? The SEC’s Division of Enforcement is in charge of investigating alleged breaches of securities law. Unregistered securities offerings, insider trading, accounting errors, negligence, market manipulation, and fraud are all common reasons for SEC investigations. Need Legal Help? Let’s talk. or, give us a ring at 561-338-0037. The SEC may also investigate a company or individual if they receive a complaint from someone who has been harmed by the alleged violations. Note: If you are under investigation by the SEC, it’s generally safe to assume that you’re under investigation for or a witness to securities fraud. You are strongly enouraged to seek an expereinced SEC defense lawyer. There are Two Types of SEC Investigations: The SEC can conduct two types of investigations: formal and informal. Informal Investigations: For a vast majority of cases, investigations are informal. An informal investigation is less formal and typically occurs when the SEC has general concerns about a company or individual’s compliance with securities laws. The focus of an informal investigation is broader, and the SEC typically relies on information provided by the company or individual under investigation as well as other sources such as whistleblowers. This means that the SEC staff will review the facts and evidence available to them and make a determination as to whether or not an enforcement action is warranted. Following an informal investigation, the SEC may choose to take no action, issue a warning letter, or file a formal enforcement action. Formal Investigation: A formal investigation is more serious and typically occurs when the SEC has specific evidence that a violation of securities laws has occurred. In a formal investigation, the SEC will often use its subpoena power to obtain documents and other information from the company or individual being investigated. The SEC generally reserves formal investigations for more-important matters involving large sums of money or a large number of investors. However, this isn’t always the case, and Enforcement Division staff may elect to pursue a formal inquiry in any situation where it appears that administrative, civil, or criminal fines might be appropriate. All SEC investigations are conducted privately. Facts and evidence obtained by the SEC during an investigation are not made public unless and until the SEC files a formal enforcement action. What Happens When You are Under Investigation? First, you will NOT be told you are under investigation by the SEC. But you will likely receive a letter from the SEC’s Division of Enforcement with a Subpoena requesting documents and/or requiring you to give testimony. At that point, you can request the opportunity to view the Formal Order of Investigation with a summary of the investigation underway. It is a very general description and rarely identifies who or what conduct is under investigation. In most cases, it is important to respond to the SEC as quickly as possible and to provide them with all of the relevant information. Failure to respond or provide false information can lead to civil and criminal penalties. It is strongly advised that you seek legal representation if you are under investigation by the SEC before you respond to the SEC’s letter. An experienced securities defense lawyer will be able to help you navigate the process and protect your rights. What are the Risks of Not Responding to an SEC Investigation? If you do not respond to an SEC investigation, the SEC may take enforcement action against you. This could include filing a lawsuit against you or seeking a court order requiring you to take specific actions such as making restitution to investors or ceasing and desisting from certain activities. The SEC may also seek to bar you from working in the securities industry or from participating in penny stock offerings if you are a registered person. How Long Do SEC Investigations Take? The length of an SEC investigation can vary depending on the facts and circumstances of the case. However, in most cases, the SEC will take a many months to investigate a company or individual before making a decision on whether to take enforcement action. Need Legal Help? Let’s talk. or, give us a ring at 561-338-0037. Of course there are factors outside of the SEC’s control that can also affect the length of an investigation, such as the availability of witnesses or the need to gather evidence from foreign jurisdictions. You can learn more about the SEC’s enforcement process by visiting the SEC’s website. What Happens After an SEC Investigation? After an SEC investigation, the Enforcement Division will decide whether to take enforcement action. Of course, the ideal case (when the SEC has started an investigation) is to conclude the inquiry with no evidence of wrongdoing. However, if the SEC’s Enforcement Division decides to take action, the division will file a lawsuit in federal court. The SEC’s litigation is generally public, and the agency will typically issue a press release announcing its action. The press release will include a summary of the allegations and the relief being sought by the SEC. Defendants in SEC lawsuits have the right to be represented by an attorney and to file a response to the SEC’s allegations. The litigation will proceed through the court system, and a final judgment will be issued by the court. What’s a Wells Notice? If the SEC decides that they want to pursue a formal enforcement action against you, they will send you what is known as a Wells Notice. A Wells Notice is a formal notification from the SEC that they are considering bringing an enforcement action against you for violating securities law. It gives you an opportunity to respond to the...

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How to Sue a Financial Advisor or Stockbroker Over Investment Losses

If you’ve lost a significant amount of money in your investment portfolios, you could be wondering if you can sue your financial advisor or broker to help recover those losses. While every case is different, there are a number of factors that will influence whether or not you have a successful lawsuit. In this article, we will discuss some of the key things to consider if you are thinking about suing your financial advisor or stockbroker. Can I Sue My Financial Advisor? The short answer is yes, you can sue your financial advisor if you have suffered losses as a result of your advisor – or the financial institute they work for – actions or inaction. Securities and investment claims in the United States are usually resolved through FINRA’s arbitration procedure. Investment Losses? Let’s talk. or, give us a ring at 561-338-0037. IMPORTANT: If you are considering suing your advisor, it is important to seek legal counsel. Do not file without legal representation. Securities is a complex area of law, and without an experienced investment loss attorney, you may not be able to recover the full extent of your losses. A Financial Advisor’s Duty of Care People hire financial advisors and brokers to grow and protect their money. Financial advisors have advanced education and training, which should provide their clients with valuable insight and accurate financial advice. Individual investors expect that their advisors will not defraud or harm them in any other way. Market volatility is difficult to predict with any certainty. Markets dip and rebound over time. A financial advisor must guide you through those difficult times and offer you sound investment advice to minimize or avoid losses.  Some investments are riskier than others. Brokers and financial advisors need to understand their clients’ risk tolerance, as well as their clients’ investment needs. Losses could ruin years of hard work and financial planning.  Market volatility is one thing—negligence, deception, and fraud are something else entirely. Therefore, you should review your portfolio closely to see if you are a victim of misconduct.

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FINRA Arbitration in 2022: Disputes, Process, and Guide

This is your definitive guide to FINRA arbitration in 2022. In this article you will learn: how disputes are handles under FINRA arbitration, the FINRA arbitration process, and what to expect if you are involved in a FINRA arbitration case. We will also cover the most important information that you will need to know about FINRA arbitration in 2022 so that you can be prepared if you find yourself involved in a case. FINRA Overview FINRA, the acronym for Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, governs disputes between investors and brokers and disputes between brokers. In this article, we solely concentrate on how an individual private investor files a claim to recover losses against their broker or financial advisor.  We will explain how FINRA fits into the securities regulatory scheme. We will discuss how FINRA provides services designed to resolve disputes in a cost-effective manner that is quicker than a traditional court and give some insight into how FINRA‘s arbitration procedure works. Next, we will examine the pros and cons of FINRA arbitration. Lastly, we will discuss how a highly experienced lawyer who has represented numerous clients successfully at FINRA arbitration can help you recover your damages from your broker or financial advisor.  What Is FINRA? FINRA is not a government agency. Unlike the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), FINRA is an organization established by Congress to oversee the brokerage industry. FINRA is a self-governing body and operates independently from the U.S. government. By contrast, the SEC more broadly regulates the buying and selling of securities on various exchanges such as the New York Stock Exchange, NASDAQ, and the American Stock Exchange. The SEC approves initial public offerings and secondary offerings and can halt trading to avoid a crash if necessary.  Additionally, the SEC has law enforcement powers. Along with the FBI and the U.S. Attorneys Office, the SEC can investigate acts surrounding the buying, selling, and issuing of securities. The U.S. Attorney can pursue charges for crimes relating to the stock market, such as insider trading and wire fraud. While the SEC has the authority to file civil lawsuits against any person or organization violating the securities statutes and the SEC’s rules. How Is FINRA Different from the SEC? FINRA has a different function than the SEC altogether. FINRA is a regulatory agency designed to promote public confidence in the brokerage industry and the financial markets as well. People will not invest if they believe they have trusted unscrupulous financial advisors to protect their economic interests. FINRA ensures that its members comply with the ethical rules of their profession, similar to a state bar for attorneys or a board of registration for medical professionals.  Congress granted FINRA authorization to investigate complaints investors make concerning misconduct, fraud, or potentially criminal behavior. As a result, FINRA can discipline its members if the agency determines that a broker violated its professional code. FINRA can assess fines, place restrictions on a broker’s authority, or expel the member from its ranks for an egregious violation. Anyone who suspects their broker or their financial advisor of wrongdoing should file a complaint with FINRA’s complaint center for investors.  You should be aware that FINRA’s rules do not restrict you from filing a complaint seeking an investigation into wrongdoing and pursuing monetary damages in arbitration.  FINRA Alternative Dispute Resolution FINRA provides a forum for investors to resolve their disputes with their brokers or financial advisors. In fact, FINRA boasts the largest securities dispute resolution forum in the US. FINRA offers arbitration services, as well as mediation services, as a means to avoid costly and inefficient litigation in courts. FINRA provides a fair, effective, and efficient forum to resolve broker disputes. FINRA’s goal is to settle disputes quickly and efficiently without the standard procedural and discovery requirements that bog down cases filed in courts.  How Does Arbitration Work with FINRA? Arbitration is an alternative to filing a case in civil court. Arbitration tends to be less formal and is designed to process claims more quickly than filing a lawsuit in court.  FINRA’s arbitration process involves resolving monetary disputes among brokers and investors. FINRA’s arbitrators can issue monetary judgments and have the authority to order a broker to deliver securities to you if that is a just resolution of the case.  An arbitration hearing is similar to a trial in court. The parties admit evidence and argue their side to a neutral person or panel of arbitrators who will decide the case. The arbitrator’s decision, called an award, is the judgment of the case and is final. You should know that you do not have the right to appeal the award to another arbitrator. You may have an opportunity to pursue an appeal in court under limited circumstances. However, you cannot elect to arbitrate your case and then file a complaint in court seeking a trial on the issues decided by the arbitrator.  FINRA’s arbitration forum operates under the rules set forth by the SEC. FINRA ensures that the platform serves as it should and facilitates ending disputes. No member of FINRA participates in the arbitration. FINRA merely provides the forum and enforces the rules. Arbitrators decide the cases.  The arbitrators typically need about 16 months to issue an award. This is a lot quicker than court, where cases could take years to get to trial. The parties also have the opportunity to resolve the dispute by negotiating among themselves without going to arbitration.  FINRA’s Arbitration Forum Protects Investor Confidentiality Arbitration with FINRA is often confidential. The parties can share information about their case if they choose. However, they do not have to do so. By contrast, court filings are public records. Any person could view the court file and learn all the private information contained in the pleadings. The pleadings that the parties must file in FINRA arbitration cases are not public records. Notwithstanding, FINRA posts arbitration awards for anyone to see in its online database. The underlying pleadings remain confidential even though FINRA publishes the award online. Posting the...

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How to File a SEC Complaint or Report Fraud Against a Broker

Your investments are important—that’s why so many individuals hire investment brokers and financial advisors to manage their investment accounts.  Having a qualified broker can be a great advantage to the growth of your investments. Unfortunately, however, investment and securities fraud remains a common and serious issue in the United States each year. So what do you do if you are a victim of investment fraud at the hands of your broker?  The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has a mission of protecting investors; maintaining fair, orderly, and efficient markets; and facilitating capital formation. In furtherance of this goal, the SEC allows individual investors to file complaints against their broker or their broker’s firm. If your broker committed negligence or broker fraud, you may be entitled to file a complaint and recover your losses. Violations of securities law can be reported to the SEC, which will conduct a comprehensive investigation.  Looking for information on how to file an SEC complaint against a broker? Look no further than the Law Offices of Robert Wayne Pearce, P.A. Not only can our attorneys help you report your broker, but we can also help you recover your investment losses.  Filing a complaint against your broker with the SEC can be a great way to hold them accountable and put future investors on notice of their wrongdoing. However, doing so doesn’t necessarily help you get your money back. Contacting an attorney, however, can be the first step toward actually recovering your personal investment losses that you suffered at the hands of your broker.  Stockbroker fraud attorney Robert Wayne Pearce has over 40 years of experience handling complex securities, commodities, and investment arbitration and litigation cases. He has helped countless clients through their investment-related disputes, and he will fight to do the same for you. Please don’t hesitate to send us an online message or call (800) 732-2889 today for assistance. Why Would I File a Complaint? There are numerous reasons you may need to file a complaint with the SEC against your broker. Common examples of wrongful actions by a broker or brokerage firm include: Offering fraudulent or unregistered securities;  Misappropriating client funds; Insider trading; Making false or misleading statements; and Failing to file required reports with the SEC. Of course, not all actions by a broker constitute fraud for which you can file a complaint with the SEC. Remember, the stock market is inherently volatile, so the fact that you lost money does not necessarily mean your broker took any wrongful actions.  An experienced investment fraud attorney can help you determine whether filing a complaint with the SEC against a broker might be warranted. Filing a Complaint with the SEC Against a Broker: What You Need to Know If you suffer financial losses due to the negligence or misconduct of a broker or brokerage firm, filing a complaint with the SEC against the broker can be an important step to take.  Not only can this help prevent future investors from being subject to the same fraudulent and predatory actions, but it may also provide you with an avenue to recover your losses. How to File a Complaint Against a Broker The first step in reporting your broker for fraud or misconduct is to file your formal complaint with the SEC.  The SEC provides an opportunity for members of the public at large to submit broker complaints electronically using the SEC’s Investor Complaint Form.  What to Include in Your Complaint The Investor Complaint Form may appear simple to complete. However, there is more to it than you might think.  The form requires basic information such as: Your name and address; Basic information about your broker; The type of investment involved; A brief description of the events giving rise to your complaint; and Any actions you may have already to resolve your complaint against your broker, such as mediation, arbitration, or court action. The complaint form can play a vital role in whether the SEC allows your case to move forward. Thus, the more information you are able to provide, the better equipped the SEC will be to investigate your complaint. An experienced investment fraud attorney can be a great benefit to you as you complete your Investor Complaint Form and move forward in the process.  What Happens After Submitting My Complaint to the SEC After the SEC receives your complaint, they will thoroughly investigate your claim and all relevant evidence.  Central to the process is confidentiality. The SEC conducts its investigations in a manner that will protect the parties and preserve the integrity of the complaint process.  Then, depending on the allegations asserted in your form, the complaint will be referred to the appropriate SEC office. The Office of Investor Education and Advocacy The Office of Investor Education and Advocacy handles basic investor questions regarding securities law and complaints related to financial professionals. These SEC officers will also advise complainants of possible remedies and, in some cases, will intervene on your behalf and reach out to brokers or other financial advisors concerning the issues raised in your complaint. This office may also refer your complaint to another division of the SEC for resolution. Enforcement Division The Division of Enforcement, on the other hand, employs attorneys to review information and tips regarding securities law violations.  Officers in this office investigate the claims in their entirety, retrieving whatever evidence may be necessary. Again, it is important to note that the investigations conducted by the SEC are typically confidential unless made a matter of public record.  After completing a thorough investigation, the Enforcement Division may recommend that the SEC bring civil actions in federal court or before an administrative law judge to prosecute securities law violations.  Why Hire an Investment Loss Attorney to Assist with Complaints Against Your Broker? Reporting the fraudulent misconduct of a broker to the SEC is important. However, filing an SEC complaint is not the only way to hold a broker or brokerage firm accountable.  In fact, in some cases, filing an SEC complaint...

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How to File a Formal Complaint Against Your Financial Advisor

When you hire a financial advisor, you expect the advisor to act in your best interest to prevent unnecessary losses. Unfortunately, however, financial advisors do not always live up to these expectations. In some cases, a financial advisor fails to follow an investor’s requests and guidelines or otherwise engages in misconduct, causing the investor to suffer losses. When this happens, the investor may be able to file an official complaint against the financial advisor through the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA). In this article you will learn how to file a complaint against a financial advisor to recover your losses.

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Can I Sue My Financial Advisor For Structured Note Investment Losses?

Structured notes are investments that combine securities from several asset classes to create a single investment with a particular risk and return profile over a time period. Unfortunately, investment loss is not unheard of with structured notes. This article will try to explain how a structured note works and what you can do if you have lost money due to an advisor’s bad purchase decisions for you. Can I Sue My Financial Advisor For Structured Note Investment Losses? Yes, you can sue your financial advisor for structured note investment losses for one or more of the following reasons: The nature, mechanics, or risks of the structured note were misrepresented. The financial advisor failed to provide you with a prospectus, offering memorandum, or otherwise disclose all of the material risks of the structured product investment. The recommendation that you invest in a particular structured note was unsuitable. Your account was over-concentrated in structured notes which may otherwise have been suitable for a small percentage (10% or less) of your portfolio. What Are Structured Notes? Structured notes are investments which often combine securities of different asset classes as one investment for a desired risk and return over a period of time. They are complex investments that are often misunderstood by not only investors but the financial advisors who recommend them.  Structured notes are manufactured by financial institutions in all sizes and shapes. Generally, a structured note is an unsecured obligation of an issuer with a return, generally paid at maturity, that is linked to the performance of an underlying asset, such as a securities market index, exchange traded fund, and/or individual stocks. The return on the structured note will depend on the performance of the underlying asset and the specific features of the investment being made. The different features and risks of structured notes can affect the terms and issuance, returns at maturity, and the value of the structured product before maturity. They may have limited or no liquidity before maturity. Before investing, you better make sure you understand the terms and conditions and risks associated with the structured note being offered. Structured notes are often represented as investments being guaranteed by large financial institutions. Indeed, the top issuers of structured notes in 2021, Goldman Sachs (12.75%), Morgan Stanley (12.70%), Citigroup (12.46%), J.P. Morgan (11.92%), UBS (80.47%), Credit Suisse (4.99%), RBC (4.45%), Bank of America (3.90%), Scotiabank (3.89%), are some of the largest financial institutions in the world. It’s important to understand that although the benefits of owning structured products may be guaranteed to be paid by one of those large financial institutions, the amount of interest or principal being guaranteed is dependent upon the features of the product being sold; that is, the specific terms and conditions of the investment contract being purchased. In this low-interest rate environment the most popular structured notes being offered are structured notes with principal protection and income features. Some of the structured notes offer full principal protection, but others offer partial or no protection of principal at all. Some structured notes offer higher rates of interest that may be paid monthly and then suddenly stop paying any interest at all because payment was contingent upon certain events not happening. It all depends on the terms and conditions of the investment contract being purchased, which is why you must read the term sheet or better yet the prospectus to understand the nature, mechanics and risks of the structured note being sold. You need to understand that there are many key terms beyond the words “guarantor” and “guaranteed” which are used often to describe structured notes. You need to ask about and be sure to understand the following features of the structured notes being offered: the nature of the “reference asset” (a/k/a the “underlyings”) the reference index(es), ETF(s), or stock(s) underlying the structured note. whether the “reference asset” gets put to you at maturity (delivered) or you get paid in cash and forced to realize a loss. the “barrier levels” which can dictate the payment of interest and/or return of capital to the investor in the structured notes. whether the notes “auto-callable” which might force you to realize permanent loss that might not otherwise have occurred if you were allowed to hold the securities through market fluctuation. the “redemption dates,” or “observation dates, ” which may impact the amount of payment of principal or interest you ultimately receive. whether the interest payments subject to a “contingent coupon” and, if so, be sure you know the contingency parameter and the level where your interest payments may stop. How the “closing value” and/or “final value” of the “reference asset (as)” are calculated on the “redemption date(s)” or “observation date(s).” Are Structured Notes Suitable Investments? Let me answer that question this way, a particular structured note may be suitable for somebody but not everybody. With regard to the more common structured notes being offered by the major financial institutions these days, they are not suitable for individuals seeking an investment that: produces fixed periodic interest payments, or other non-contingent sources of income and/or you cannot tolerate receiving few or no interest payments over the term of the notes in the event the closing value of the underlings or reference stock falls below a barrier level on one or more of the observation dates. participates in the full appreciation of the reference stock rather than an investment with a return that is limited to the contingent interest payments, if any, paid on the notes. provides for the full repayment of principal at maturity, and/or you are unwilling or unable to accept the risk that you may lose some or all of the principal amount of the notes in the event the final value of the reference asset falls below the barrier value. They are not suitable investments if you are someone who: anticipates that the closing value of the reference asset will decline during the term of the notes such that the closing value of the reference asset will fall below...

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FINRA Rule 3210 Overview

FINRA Rule 3210 is a newer FINRA rule, approved by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) in the Spring of 2016. The regulators’ goal in approving this rule was to prevent conflicts of interest by financial advisors and broker dealers. To carry out this goal, the rule governs the ability of registered financial advisors to use investment accounts outside of the accounts offered by their FINRA member firm.  Rule 3210 requires financial advisors to make a request and obtain consent from the FINRA member firm they work for to keep their accounts somewhere else. It also requires a disclosure letter to the outside firm when a securities industry professional opens an account. This disclosure action is sometimes referred to as a FINRA 3210 Letter. Making this disclosure is one important step in preventing conflicts of interest for either firm.  At the Law Offices of Robert Wayne Pearce, P.A., we are committed to helping you enhance your investor education and understand all the FINRA registered broker dealer rules that may impact your decision-making. What is FINRA Rule 3210? FINRA adopted Rule 3210 in 2016, which required all employees to notify their employers if they intend to open or maintain an investment account at a competing financial firm. Rule 3210 governs accounts opened by members at firms other than where they work. Need Legal Help? Let’s talk. or, give us a ring at 561-338-0037. IMPORTANT: Understanding rules like FINRA Rule 3210 can help you become a well-informed investor. It may also help you know what to look for when selecting a brokerage firm or a registered financial professional. FINRA Rule 3210 Broker Dealer Overview When an individual works for a brokerage firm, they typically keep their assets at that firm. The firm is therefore able to monitor their trades and can ensure that the financial advisor is not frontrunning their clients in a personal brokerage account. The firm can also monitor the financial advisor’s account for insider trading or other bad activity. But what happens when the financial advisor works for Bank A but wishes to keep their accounts at Bank B? Rule 3210 specifies that the financial advisor must receive written permission from Bank A to open the account at Bank B. Not only may the financial advisor not open the account without permission, but they must also declare any account in which they have a “beneficial interest.” This means that if their spouse has a brokerage account at Bank B, they must disclose that to their employer as well.  These FINRA registered broker dealer rules may seem challenging at first. However, they have been carefully implemented to protect investors from financial advisor conflicts of interest. Your Financial Advisor’s Requirements Under Rule 3210 Rule 3210 is not merely about allowing your financial advisor’s employer to see what is in their account. It is primarily about preventing conflicts of interest. In doing so, the rule requires: Obtaining prior written consent for opening accounts outside of the employer firm; Giving written notification of the financial advisor’s employment at his or her brokerage firm to the brokerage firm opening the new account; and Submitting written copies of brokerage statements or transaction data to the employer firm upon request. An important part of this rule is the written consent part. Everything must be in writing under Rule 3210. Indeed, keeping written records is a requirement under most FINRA registered broker dealer rules. Maintaining a record of requests and consents is important in this case because Rule 3210 pertains to conflicts of interest. FINRA does not have a set form for requests and consents under Rule 3210. Each firm creates their own FINRA Rule 3210 letters. Even more important than consent may be the fact that a financial advisor must submit duplicate brokerage statements to their employer. A financial professional may have their brokerage accounts at an outside firm. However, their employer must have transparency into their account activity just as if the accounts were in the employer’s custody. Rule 3210 is essential in balancing the right of financial professionals to use whichever brokers they choose with an employer’s need for compliance and a client’s need for transparency.  Close Family Members Must Also Comply with FINRA 3210 It may seem hard to believe that a FINRA broker dealer rule might apply to someone who doesn’t work in the financial services industry. But it’s true—FINRA 3210 requires disclosure of accounts from the following people related to a registered financial industry professional: A spouse; A financially dependent child of the registered financial industry professional or a child of the registered financial industry professional’s spouse;  A relative over whose accounts the registered financial industry professional has control; and Any other person over whose accounts the registered financial industry professional exercises control and who they materially financially support.  In the event that both spouses work at FINRA member firms, then each spouse would have to comply with this rule. Both member firms would be notified about the other spouse’s accounts. Protecting Against Conflicts of Interest A primary goal of FINRA Rule 3210 is to prevent FINRA member conflicts of interest. Your financial advisor and your brokerage firm should be working for you, in your best interest. Where an undisclosed conflict is lurking, your broker simply cannot provide you with the advice or level of service you should expect.  An important part of investor education about FINRA broker dealer rules is to allow you to understand the issues behind rules like FINRA 3210. Being well-informed about what these rules are and how they work helps make you a savvy investor. You will be better equipped to ask questions about potential conflicts of interest. You will also know to ask about your brokerage firm’s compliance systems and record retention.  Concerned That a Conflict of Interest Has Led to Investment Loss? If you are concerned that a conflict of interest caused you investment loss, we are here to fight for your rights. When you engage an investment advisor or a brokerage firm,...

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Can an Oil Investment Fraud Lawyer Help Me Recover Losses?

Are You Dealing with Oil & Gas Investment Fraud? The Law Offices of Robert Wayne Pearce, P.A. are investigating claims against brokerage firms that sold either oil or gas stocks and other related products. Investments in the oil and gas sector have been very popular over the last few years, and depending upon when your financial advisor recommended you purchase and/or sell the investments, you may have suffered catastrophic losses.  These losses may have been the result of your financial advisors misrepresentations, omissions and misleading statements, failure to do his/her due diligence investigation, and/or unsuitable recommendations. If you believe you are dealing with oil investment fraud, now is the time to consider hiring an experienced investment fraud lawyer. The attorneys at The Law Offices of Robert Wayne Pearce, P.A. help oil and gas investors review their oil-related investments to determine if they have been the victim of oil investment fraud. Investors who have suffered large losses may be able recover some of their losses through FINRA arbitration against oil brokerage firms which improperly sold oil or oil futures contracts while withholding material information on the risks of investing in oil. Give us a call at 800-732-2889 or contact us online. Let’s discuss your case and see what we can do to help get you the compensation you deserve. What is Considered Oil & Gas Investment Fraud? Oil and gas investments take many different forms, including oil and gas stocks, oil and gas drilling programs, oil and gas limited partnerships, oil futures contracts, oil or gas royalty interests in wells which produce oil through a “fee title” arrangement. Fraudulent oil investment activity may fall into one of two categories: fraud by omission or fraud by commission. Fraud by omission occurs when the seller fails to disclose material information, while oil investment fraud by commission occurs when the seller provides false information to oil investors. Both forms of oil and gas investment fraud can occur at any point during oil or gas investments, including before an oil investor purchases oil stock; while oil stock is held; on the date of purchase; or after oil stocks are sold. The oil and gas industry is heavily regulated, and oil investments are subject to many federal securities laws. If oil brokerage firms fail to follow the law, oil investors may be able to recover damages for oil investment fraud by FINRA arbitration. This means that you only need help finding oil investment fraud cases where brokers failed to comply with federal securities laws or breached their fiduciary duty to oil investors. Investors should always consider oil and gas investments to be high risk due to the volatility in oil prices. Some oil stock brokers have been accused of selling oil stocks at inflated oil prices based on false information, while others may have failed to inform investors of risks associated with a particular oil or gas company. If a brokerage firm did not disclose the risks or oil prices to an oil and gas investor prior to a sale, the oil investment fraud lawyer at The Law Offices of Robert Wayne Pearce, P.A. can help investors recover losses from oil-related investments through FINRA arbitration. Some Oil & Gas Investment Fraud Allegations Include: – Misrepresentation of oil company facts made to oil and gas investors. – Failure to disclose oil stock risks prior to oil & gas investments. – Misleading oil companies by encouraging oil companies to change accounting methods in order to show higher oil reserves than actually exist. Give us a call at 800-732-2889 or contact The Law Offices of Robert Wayne Pearce, P.A. oil investment fraud law firm online to speak with oil investment fraud attorney Robert Wayne Pearce today about oil and gas stock investments, oil and gas limited partnerships, oil futures contracts and oil and gas drilling programs. Recovering Oil & Gas Investment Losses Through FINRA Arbitration If oil brokerage firms failed to disclose oil stock risks or oil prices prior to oil & gas investments, oil and gas investors may be able to recover oil-related losses by FINRA arbitration. FINRA, the acronym for Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, is a non-governmental regulatory association which governs disputes between investors and brokerage firms, including disputes on oil investment fraud allegations. You can learn more about the FINRA arbitration process here. File a Claim with FINRA The formal arbitration process for oil and gas, oil stock fraud cases begins with the filing of a statement of claim by you or your investment fraud attorney. The investor who files the FINRA claim against the brokerage firm is referred to as the “Claimant” in the FINRA arbitration proceedings. If you are an investor, the state of claim is the most important document in your case. This document describes what happened to cause you to lose capital in your oil & gas investment and why you or your FINRA arbitration attorney believes that you are entitled to win a monetary award or relief against the brokerage firm. IMPORTANT: It’s critical that you and/or your attorneys write a clear, concise, accurate, and honest description of what happened as well as a strong case in favor of winning the arbitration. You can learn more about how to file a FINRA complaint and the FINRA complaint process here. The oil fraud attorneys at the Law Offices of Robert Wayne Pearce, P.A. are experienced FINRA arbitration lawyers who have a thorough understanding of the arbitration process. We understand what’s at risk in securities, commodities, and investment law issues, and we fight to obtain the best possible outcome every time. Past Investor Recoveries The Law Offices of Robert Wayne Pearce, P.A., has helped recover millions of dollars in valuable compensation for defrauded investors. Below are some notable victories in past investor recoveries.  $21,041,285 FEDERAL COURT FINAL JUDGMENT In 2010, Robert Pearce won a case in federal court for $21,041,285. The final judgment was entered against the defendant for fraud, breach of fiduciary duty, and civil theft pursuant to Florida Statutes Sections 812.014 and 772.11. $7,840,000 FINRA ARBITRATION SETTLEMENT...

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Announcing 2021 Winner – Robert Wayne Pearce Investor Fraud Awareness Scholarship

As promised, today we are announcing the 2021 winners of the Robert Wayne Pearce Investor Fraud Awareness Scholarship. Over the course of the year, we received applications from over 30 students from schools around the country who all wrote quality essays about the dangers of investment fraud and how we can protect ourselves. It was a difficult decision to select just one student winner and so, in addition to the grand prize of $2,500, we have selected 5 other students who are being awarded consolation prizes of $100 each for their efforts and sharing their thoughts on investment fraud and how to protect ourselves. The winner of the $2500 scholarship is Karen Simpson, a student at Palm Beach State College, who wrote, among other things: Investment fraud is a very real and serious problem that happens more than you may realize. But it doesn’t have to scare you away from investing your money in fear of losing it. Learning about the different types of investment fraud and how to protect yourself from fraud, before you decide to invest, is extremely important! You could not only experience financial loss but suffer compromised identity, damaged credit, and emotional issues including rage, frustration, and fear. *** Knowledge is power, and so I also recommend you educate yourself by learning about general nature, mechanics and risks of different types of investments before you start investing. I find an excellent starting point to educate myself is Investopedia, www.investopedia.com. You can also find specific financial information, including, annual reports, prospectuses and offering circulars about companies recommended to compare what you were told about a recommended investment by searching the U. S. Securities and Exchange Commission Edgar website for information, www.sec.gov/edgar/search-and-access.  *** The easiest way to protect yourself is to use common sense, look for the red flags and ask questions. Follow a strict check list of do’s and do nots, if it sounds too good to be true, in most cases, it is. If you notice any red flags about an investment, avoid it, as well as the person making the recommendation. That “High Guaranteed Returns” pitch they love to give, don’t believe it. Every investment carries some degree of risk, which is generally reflected in the rate of return you are promised. The higher the return, the higher the risk! The winners of the $100 consolation prizes are as follows: India Bartram of the University of Syracuse, Syracuse, New York Jacob Paul of Villanova University –Charles Widger School of Law, Villanova, Pennsylvania  Kylie Fay of the University of South Alabama, Mobile, Alabama Natalia Capella of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee Rafael Whalen of John Paul The Great Catholic School, Escondido, California We thank all of the other applicants for their efforts, as well, and announce that the next scholarship to be awarded December 15, 2022 will be given to the student who writes the most thoughtful essay about whether they believe the Robinhood Markets, Inc. (“Robinhood”) Investment App is a good tool for novice investors or just game to take advantage of them and make money for the stock brokerage firm. We are interested in learning whether you think Robinhood platform is living up to the legend of Robinhood, who took from the rich and gave to the poor!

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