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The Law Offices of Robert Wayne Pearce, P.A. understands what is at stake in securities, commodities and investment law matters and constantly strives to secure the most favorable possible result. Mr. Pearce provides a complete review of your case and fully explains your legal options. The firm works to ensure that you have all of the information necessary to make a sound decision before any action is taken in your case.

For dedicated representation by a law firm with substantial experience in all kinds of securities, commodities and investment disputes, contact the firm by phone at 561-338-0037, toll free at 800-732-2889 or via e-mail. We may also be able to arrange a meeting with you at offices located in Boca Raton, Fort Lauderdale, Miami and West Palm Beach, Florida and elsewhere.

How to File a Complaint Against a Financial Advisor

When investors hire a financial advisor, they expect the advisor to act in their best interest to prevent unnecessary losses. Unfortunately, however, financial advisors do not always live up to these expectations.  In some cases, a financial advisor fails to follow an investor’s requests and guidelines or otherwise engages in misconduct, causing the investor to suffer losses. When this happens, the investor may be able to file a complaint against the advisor to recover his or her losses.  But how do you file a complaint against a financial advisor? And when do you know it may be time to do so?  If you or a loved one has suffered significant investment losses at the hands of your financial advisor, contact The Law Offices of Robert Wayne Pearce, P.A., today. With more than 40 years of experience, our investment loss recovery attorneys can help you understand when and how to file a complaint against an advisor. Give us a call to discuss your case, and see what our team can do for you.  A Brief Overview of FINRA and How It Affects Your Ability to File a Complaint Against a Financial Advisor Before discussing how to file a complaint against an advisor, it is important to have an understanding of the process in general and whether you can bring a claim at all.  Financial advisors and their employers are governed by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA). FINRA’s stated mission is to “safeguard the investing public against fraud and bad practices.” FINRA has the power to take disciplinary actions against registered financial advisors or broker-dealers who violate the industry’s rules.  In 2019, FINRA reported that it initiated 854 disciplinary actions, levied $39.5 million in fines, and ordered restitution of $27.9 million be paid to investors. FINRA also expelled 6 member firms, suspended 21 member firms, barred 348 individuals from the securities industry, and suspended 415 individuals.  In short, FINRA provides significant protections for investors and processes through which advisors can be held accountable for their misconduct. However, it is important to note that you may not be able to file a complaint against an advisor in court as you might expect.  Required Investor Arbitration When you open a brokerage account with a member firm regulated by FINRA, you will likely sign a customer agreement. This agreement controls many aspects of the investor-advisor relationship, including potential disputes you may have with your advisor or their firm in the future.  More often than not, these customer agreements contain a mandatory arbitration clause. An investor must arbitrate through FINRA when:  There is a written arbitration agreement;  The dispute is with a broker or firm who is a member of FINRA; and The dispute is related to the securities business of the broker or firm.  If all these are true, then you must bring any claim you may have against your broker or their firm to FINRA arbitration, rather than filing a lawsuit in the court system. Nevertheless, you do still have an opportunity for your claim to be heard and to hold your advisor accountable.  How FINRA Arbitration Works Many people believe that going to court is the best way to hold a financial advisor accountable. However, this is not necessarily the case. In fact, FINRA arbitration is much more common than you might think.  Arbitration is an alternative dispute resolution method that allows parties to a legal dispute to resolve their issues outside of court. Much like in a court case, the parties file pleadings, present testimony and evidence, and make oral arguments.  The key difference between a trial and arbitration is the forum. Whereas a trial is presented in front of a judge or jury, an arbitration is presented before a panel of independent arbitrators chosen by the parties.  However, just as a judge or jury renders a final judgment at trial, an arbitration panel also renders a final and binding award on the parties in the arbitration. Thus, arbitration can still be an effective method of resolving your claims with a financial advisor.  When Can I File a FINRA Complaint Against a Financial Advisor? Just because you lost money on an investment does not necessarily mean you should file a complaint against your financial advisor. Rather, you must show that you lost money because of your financial advisor’s negligence or misconduct.  Some of the most common types of investment fraud for which you may be able to file a complaint against your financial advisor include:  Ponzi schemes,  Pyramid schemes, “Pump and dump” scams, Advance fee fraud,  High yield investment frauds, and  Offshore scams.  Additionally, financial advisors have a fiduciary duty to their investors to reasonably invest and manage their investments. If your financial advisor breaches his or her duty, resulting in monetary loss, you may be entitled to file a complaint.  Of course, there are many ways in which a financial advisor can commit misconduct. For more information on what constitutes a breach of duty by a financial advisor, read our post, Can I Sue My Financial Advisor Over Losses? Filing Your Complaint Against a Financial Advisor The first step in initiating your complaint is completing what is called a “statement of claim.” The statement of claim details what occurred in your particular case.  This is your opportunity to tell FINRA your side of the story, so it is imperative that it is as complete and detailed as possible. You then submit your statement of claim to FINRA, after which time the case will move forward.  The steps following the filing of your complaint include:  The filing of an answer by the opposing party,  Arbitrator selection,  Prehearing conferences,  Discovery,  The arbitration hearing, and Final decision and awards. FINRA’s arbitration process can be faster and less formal than a court trial. However, it is still helpful to have an experienced attorney in your corner.  An investment fraud attorney can help you draft and file your statement of claim. This is arguably one of the most important parts of the FINRA arbitration process. ...

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LPL Financial LLC Sued For Scott Lanza’s Sales Of REITs And BDCs

LPL Financial LLC (“LPL”) is a securities brokerage firm with offices in Boca Raton, Florida and elsewhere. It is regulated by Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”).  LPL offered and sold to Claimants the investments at issue in this arbitration, namely, non-traded Real Estate Investment Trusts and Business Development Companies through Scott Lanza (“Mr. Lanza”) an individual registered with FINRA as an “Associate Member” of LPL.  The brokerage firm LPL has been sued because it is vicariously liable for Mr. Lanza’s acts, omissions and other misconduct described more fully herein.

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Can I Sue My Financial Advisor Over Losses?

People hire financial advisors and brokers to grow and protect their money. Financial advisors have advanced education and training, which should provide their clients with valuable insight and accurate financial advice. Individual investors expect that their advisors will not defraud or harm them in any other way. Market volatility is difficult to predict with any certainty. Markets dip and rebound over time. A financial advisor must guide you through those difficult times and offer you sound investment advice to minimize or avoid losses.  Some investments are riskier than others. Brokers and financial advisors need to understand their clients’ risk tolerance, as well as their clients’ investment needs. Losses could ruin years of hard work and financial planning.  Market volatility is one thing—negligence, deception, and fraud are something else entirely. Therefore, you should review your portfolio closely to see if you are a victim of misconduct.

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Solicited vs. Unsolicited Trades: Understanding the Difference

Ideally, hiring a skilled broker takes some of the risk out of investing. Unfortunately, however, some brokers fail to act with the appropriate level of integrity. As an investor, it’s very important to understand the difference between solicited and unsolicited trades. The distinction has significant consequences on your ability to recover losses from a bad trade. What’s the Difference Between Solicited and Unsolicited Trades? Solicited trades differ from unsolicited trades based on who originally suggested the trade. A solicited trade is one “solicited” by the broker; in other words, the broker sees the potential trade and recommends it to the investor. As a result, the broker is ultimately responsible for the consideration and execution of the trade because he or she brought it to the investor’s attention. In contrast, unsolicited trades are those initially suggested by the investor. The responsibility for unsolicited trades therefore lies primarily with the investor, while the broker merely facilitates the investor’s proposed transaction.

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What Is a Broker CRD Number?

Brokers and brokerage firms in the United States must register with the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA). Without registering, firms and individuals may not conduct security transactions. By maintaining a registration system, FINRA can better monitor and record the activities of registered brokers. FINRA offers a free online service for investors to check the history of their brokers for suspensions, sanctions, or other FINRA actions. What Is a Broker CRD Number? FINRA manages the Central Registration Depository (CRD) program. This program covers the licensing and registration of individuals and firms in the securities industry in the United States. When a broker or firm registers with FINRA, the regulator assigns them a CRD number. Investors can use a broker’s CRD number to check that broker’s work history and disciplinary record using BrokerCheck. 

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Non-Discretionary Accounts vs. Discretionary Accounts

When investors first set up an account with a brokerage firm, that account is designated as either discretionary or non-discretionary. Unfortunately, many investors are simply unaware of the status of their account or what it means. This is usually because investment brokers fail to properly explain each type of account. However, knowing what kind of investment account you have is important. The claims available to a victim of investment fraud or broker misconduct depend on the status of your account.

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FINRA Statute of Limitations: A Brief Overview

Investment brokers have a duty to treat their clients honesty and with integrity. Those who take advantage of, mislead, or steal from their clients shake the investing industry’s foundation. Regrettably, broker misconduct occurs all too often.  You need representation from an attorney who has the knowledge, skill, and extensive experience to help you recover your losses if you are a victim of investment broker misconduct. Robert Wayne Pearce and his staff with The Law Offices of Robert Wayne Pearce, P.A., have over 40 years of experience fighting on behalf of investors victimized by broker misconduct. Contact us today to protect your rights. 

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J.P. Morgan Sued for Edward Turley and Steven Foote’s Alleged Margin Account Misconduct

J.P. Morgan Securities, LLC (“J.P. Morgan”) employed San Francisco Financial Advisor Edward Turley (“Mr. Turley”) and his former New York City partner, Steven Foote (“Mr. Foote”), and is being sued for their alleged stockbroker fraud and stockbroker misconduct involving a highly speculative trading investment strategy in highly leveraged margin accounts1. We represent a family (the “Claimants”) in the Southwest who built a successful manufacturing business and entrusted their savings to J.P. Morgan and its two financial advisors to manage by investing in “solid companies” and in a “careful” manner. At the outset, it is important for our readers to know that our clients’ allegations have not yet been proven. We are providing information about our clients’ allegations and seeking information from other investors who did business with J.P. Morgan, Mr. Turley, and/or Mr. Foote and had similar investments, a similar investment strategy, and a similar bad experience to help us win our clients’ case.

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Securities-Backed Lines of Credit can be More Dangerous Than Margin Accounts!

Securities-Backed Lines of Credit Can Be More Dangerous Than Margin Accounts! Many investors have heard of margin accounts and the horror stories of others who invested on margin and suffered substantial losses. But few investors understand that securities-backed lines of credit (SBL) accounts, which have been aggressively promoted by brokerage firms in the last decade, are just as dangerous as margin accounts. This is largely due to the fact that the equity and bond markets have been on an upward trend since 2009 and few investors (unless you are a Puerto Rico investor) have experienced market slides resulting margin calls due to the insufficient amount of collateral in the SBL accounts.

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Investors With “Blown-Out” Securities-Backed Credit Line and Margin Accounts: How do You Recover Your Investment Losses?

If you are reading this article, we are guessing you had a bad experience recently in either a securities-backed line of credit (“SBL”) or margin account that suffered margin calls and was liquidated without notice, causing you to realize losses. Ordinarily, investors with margin calls receive 3 to 5 days to meet them; and if that happened, the value of the securities in your account might have increased within that period and the firm might have erased the margin call and might not have liquidated your account. If you are an investor who has experienced margin calls in the past, and that is your only complaint then, read no further because when you signed the account agreement with the brokerage firm you chose to do business with, you probably gave it the right to liquidate all of the securities in your account at any time without notice. On the other hand, if you are an investor with little experience or one with a modest financial condition who was talked into opening a securities-backed line of credit account without being advised of the true nature, mechanics, and/or risks of opening such an account, then you should call us now! Alternatively, if you are an investor who needed to withdraw money for a house or to pay for your taxes or child’s education but was talked into holding a risky or concentrated portfolio of stocks and/or junk bonds in a pledged collateral account for a credit-line or a margin account, then we can probably help you recover your investment losses as well. The key to a successful recovery of your investment loss is not to focus on the brokerage firm’s liquidation of the securities in your account without notice. Instead, the focus on your case should be on what you were told and whether the recommendation was suitable for you before you opened the account and suffered the liquidation.

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