Securities & Exchange Commission Complaint: How to Report Your Broker Anonymously

Your investments are important—that’s why so many individuals hire investment brokers and financial advisors to manage their investment accounts.  Having a qualified broker can be a great advantage to the growth of your investments. Unfortunately, however, investment and securities fraud remains a common and serious issue in the United States each year. So what do you do if you are a victim of investment fraud at the hands of your broker?  The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has a mission of protecting investors; maintaining fair, orderly, and efficient markets; and facilitating capital formation. In furtherance of this goal, the SEC allows individual investors to file complaints against their broker or their broker’s firm. If your broker committed negligence or broker fraud, you may be entitled to file a complaint and recover your losses. Violations of securities law can be reported to the SEC, which will conduct a comprehensive investigation.  Looking for information on how to file an SEC complaint against a broker? Look no further than the Law Offices of Robert Wayne Pearce, P.A. Not only can our attorneys help you report your broker, but we can also help you recover your investment losses.  Filing a complaint against your broker with the SEC can be a great way to hold them accountable and put future investors on notice of their wrongdoing. However, doing so doesn’t necessarily help you get your money back. Contacting an attorney, however, can be the first step toward actually recovering your personal investment losses that you suffered at the hands of your broker.  Stockbroker fraud attorney Robert Wayne Pearce has over 40 years of experience handling complex securities, commodities, and investment arbitration and litigation cases. He has helped countless clients through their investment-related disputes, and he will fight to do the same for you. Please don’t hesitate to send us an online message or call (800) 732-2889 today for assistance. Why Would I File a Complaint? There are numerous reasons you may need to file a complaint with the SEC against your broker. Common examples of wrongful actions by a broker or brokerage firm include: Offering fraudulent or unregistered securities;  Misappropriating client funds; Insider trading; Making false or misleading statements; and Failing to file required reports with the SEC. Of course, not all actions by a broker constitute fraud for which you can file a complaint with the SEC. Remember, the stock market is inherently volatile, so the fact that you lost money does not necessarily mean your broker took any wrongful actions.  An experienced investment fraud attorney can help you determine whether filing a complaint with the SEC against a broker might be warranted. Filing a Complaint with the SEC Against a Broker: What You Need to Know If you suffer financial losses due to the negligence or misconduct of a broker or brokerage firm, filing a complaint with the SEC against the broker can be an important step to take.  Not only can this help prevent future investors from being subject to the same fraudulent and predatory actions, but it may also provide you with an avenue to recover your losses. How to File a Complaint Against a Broker The first step in reporting your broker for fraud or misconduct is to file your formal complaint with the SEC.  The SEC provides an opportunity for members of the public at large to submit broker complaints electronically using the SEC’s Investor Complaint Form.  What to Include in Your Complaint The Investor Complaint Form may appear simple to complete. However, there is more to it than you might think.  The form requires basic information such as: Your name and address; Basic information about your broker; The type of investment involved; A brief description of the events giving rise to your complaint; and Any actions you may have already to resolve your complaint against your broker, such as mediation, arbitration, or court action. The complaint form can play a vital role in whether the SEC allows your case to move forward. Thus, the more information you are able to provide, the better equipped the SEC will be to investigate your complaint. An experienced investment fraud attorney can be a great benefit to you as you complete your Investor Complaint Form and move forward in the process.  What Happens After Submitting My Complaint After the SEC receives your complaint, they will thoroughly investigate your claim and all relevant evidence.  Central to the process is confidentiality. The SEC conducts its investigations in a manner that will protect the parties and preserve the integrity of the complaint process.  Then, depending on the allegations asserted in your form, the complaint will be referred to the appropriate SEC office. The Office of Investor Education and Advocacy The Office of Investor Education and Advocacy handles basic investor questions regarding securities law and complaints related to financial professionals. These SEC officers will also advise complainants of possible remedies and, in some cases, will intervene on your behalf and reach out to brokers or other financial advisors concerning the issues raised in your complaint. This office may also refer your complaint to another division of the SEC for resolution. Enforcement Division The Division of Enforcement, on the other hand, employs attorneys to review information and tips regarding securities law violations.  Officers in this office investigate the claims in their entirety, retrieving whatever evidence may be necessary. Again, it is important to note that the investigations conducted by the SEC are typically confidential unless made a matter of public record.  After completing a thorough investigation, the Enforcement Division may recommend that the SEC bring civil actions in federal court or before an administrative law judge to prosecute securities law violations.  Why Hire an Investment Loss Attorney to Assist with Complaints Against Your Broker? Reporting the fraudulent misconduct of a broker to the SEC is important. However, filing an SEC complaint is not the only way to hold a broker or brokerage firm accountable.  In fact, in some cases, filing an SEC complaint may not be...

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What to Do When Your Financial Adviser Fails to Act in Your Best Interest

Is hiring a financial advisor in your best interest? In many cases, it may be when it comes to your investments. According to the SEC, approximately 6 in 10 households in the United States own securities investments. With more Americans investing, there is an increased need for financial advisors who can provide valuable insight into how best to invest and manage your accounts.  A financial advisor acting in your best interest is one of the best assets you can have when it comes to your investments. However, not all financial advisors live up to this standard.  Before you hire a fiduciary to represent your investment interests, it is important to first understand the duties your financial advisor owes you. By doing so, you will be better equipped to recognize when yours may not be acting in your best interest.  If you need help determining whether a financial advisor acting in your best interest and what you can do if they did not, we want to help. The Law Offices of Robert Wayne Pearce, P.A., has represented countless defrauded investors who have fallen victim to the actions of their advisors. Investment loss attorney Robert Wayne Pearce has over 40 years of experience handling a broad range of securities and investment disputes. Give us a call today to see what we can do for you. Fiduciary and Financial Advisor: Your Best Interest Is What Matters Most When you hire a financial advisor to provide you counsel regarding your investments, you expect that they will act in your best interest. The relationship between you and your advisor is a “fiduciary” relationship.  This fiduciary relationship requires a financial advisor to act in a certain manner when it comes to their clients’ investments. But what exactly is a “fiduciary duty,” and how do I know if my financial advisor owes me a duty to act in my best interest? We’ll dive into these questions in more detail below.  Fiduciary Duties: An Overview A fiduciary is someone who acts on behalf of someone else. In the investment context, a financial advisor who is hired to provide counsel and advice regarding their investments is a fiduciary. At its core, a fiduciary relationship relies on trust and good faith between the advisor and the client.  Being a fiduciary means that an investment advisor must act in their client’s best interest, putting their client’s needs over their own needs. In short, a fiduciary duty is a legal responsibility owed by the fiduciary (financial advisor) to act in the principal’s (client) best interest.  A fiduciary’s main duties are to: Put the client’s best interests first, ahead of their own; Avoid conflicts of interest or disclose them to the client as soon as they arise; and Act with honesty, good-faith, and loyalty toward the client.  Failure by a financial advisor to act in your best interest may constitute a breach of their fiduciary duty. This can result in serious liability for the advisor. Is Everyone a Fiduciary?  No, not everyone will be considered a fiduciary.  A fiduciary relationship is a special relationship that arises only in specific circumstances. The Investment Advisers Act of 1940 requires only registered investment advisors to abide by fiduciary obligations to act in a client’s best interests. Thus, all investment advisors who are registered with the SEC or a state securities regulator are fiduciaries. Broker-dealers and stockbrokers, on the other hand, are not fiduciaries. The New “Best Interest” Rule: A Replacement for the Suitability Standard Until recently, there was a lower standard of care that applied to most brokers and agents. This was governed by FINRA Rule 2111, otherwise referred to as the “suitability” standard.  Unlike a fiduciary standard of care, suitability required only that a broker-dealer make investment decisions that were “suitable” for his or her client based on the client’s investment objectives. They did not have to put their client’s interests ahead of their own. Further, they were free to recommend products that might benefit themselves, so long as the product was suitable for the client. This changed on June 30, 2020, when the SEC enacted Regulation BI—the Best Interest Rule. Now, regular stockbrokers also have a duty to act in the best interests of their retail clients when making recommendations about their investments. Specifically, Regulation BI imposes four obligations upon broker-dealers and associated persons:  Provide disclosures to customers regarding the relationship at the time of or before making any recommendations;  Exercise due care, or reasonable diligence, care, and skill, in making recommendations to customers;  Establish, maintain, and enforce procedures and policies to address potential conflicts of interest; and  Establish, maintain, and enforce procedures and policies to achieve compliance with Regulation BI.  If you feel your financial advisor or broker has failed to act in your best interest and live up to their obligations, seek help promptly from an experienced attorney. How Do I Know If Someone Is a Fiduciary? The easiest way to know for sure if a financial advisor is a fiduciary is to ask them. You can also check on the SEC Investment Advisor Database for federally registered investment advisor firms. Another way is to ask about an advisor or advisor firm’s pay structure. If an advisor is paid based on commission, he or she is most likely not a fiduciary. Fiduciaries usually work on fees only, so an advisor who advertises that they work on commission may not be acting as a fiduciary. But again, remember that even if your advisor is not a federally registered investment adviser held to a fiduciary standard, they still owe you certain obligations. All stockbrokers now have a duty to act in the best interests of their retail investors when making recommendations regarding their investments. Breach of Fiduciary Duty and What to Do If Your Financial Advisor Doesn’t Act in Your Best Interest A fiduciary breaches his or her duty by acting in their own interest rather than in their client’s interest. Additionally, failure to act in your best interest may give rise to a...

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